Archiv: Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI)


10.04.2022 - 10:11 [ Washington Post ]

Why Pakistan’s Leader Is Facing the Risk of Ouster

(April 8, 2022)

Pakistan’s military has outsized power for a country conceived as a democracy. There have been three successful military coups. When Khan became prime minister, it was only the second time since Pakistan achieved independence in 1947 that a civilian administration had transferred power to another. Even when elected governments have ruled, the military, especially the Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) agency, has played a forceful role.

(…)

Khan, who has been critical of the U.S. while seeking better relations with Russia and China, has said he would continue to pursue an “independent” foreign policy. His opponents have vowed to improve ties with the U.S. and Europe if they win.

10.04.2022 - 09:58 [ Hindustan Times ]

Imran Khan attempted to sack Pakistan army chief Gen Bajwa: Report

According to BBC Urdu, “two uninvited guests” reached the Prime Minister’s House, which was blanketed in extraordinary security, by helicopter on Saturday night and met Khan in private for about 15 minutes. An hour before this meeting, Khan had ordered the removal of a senior official who was at the meeting, the report said.

However, an official notification was not issued by the defence ministry for dismissing this senior official and appointing his successor, “thus thwarting the Prime Minister’s House’s attempt at a ‘revolutionary’ change”, the report said

04.09.2021 - 18:48 [ France24 ]

Taliban celebratory gunfire turns deadly, Pakistan’s spy chief arrives in Afghanistan

Amid reports of intense fighting in the Panjshir, Pakistan’s powerful intelligence chief made a surprise visit to Kabul on Saturday.

Hameed arrived in Kabul Saturday morning, leading a delegation of „senior Pakistani officials“, to discuss security, economic and trade issues, according to Pakistani media reports.

13.08.2021 - 21:18 [ David Drolet / Twitter ]

„For decades, Pakistan has served as a sanctuary for the Afghan Taliban, who have often crossed the countries’ rugged, 1,660-mile border with ease, and has acknowledged that Taliban maintain homes and families in Pakistan, away from the battlefields.1/2

„Former Pakistan officials are publicly cheering for Taliban.
But a collapse in Afghanistan would carry risks for Pakistan, too, including a possible wave of refugees, and a boost to jihadist movements that target Pakistan’s government for attack.“ 2/2

13.08.2021 - 21:01 [ Economic Times / Indiatimes.com ]

Pakistan NSA, ISI chief likely to visit America next week for talks on Afghanistan, says report

(24.08.2021)

Pakistan’s National Security Adviser Moeed Yusuf and ISI chief Lt Gen Faiz Hameed are likely to visit the US next week for talks with their American counterparts on the situation in Afghanistan as part of Washington’s diplomatic efforts aimed at ensuring a peaceful transfer of power in the war-torn nation, according to a media report.

13.08.2021 - 20:45 [ Wikipedia ]

Inter-Services Intelligence activities in Afghanistan

The Taliban were largely founded by Pakistan’s Interior Ministry under Naseerullah Babar and the Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) in 1994.[25][26][27][28][29][30][31][32] In 1999, Naseerullah Babar who was the minister of the interior under Bhutto during the Taliban’s ascent to power admitted, „we created the Taliban“.[33]

William Maley, Professor at the Australian National University and Director of the Asia-Pacific College, writes on the emergence of the Taliban in Afghanistan:

„In 1994, with the failure of [Gulbuddin Hekmatyar’s alliance] attempt to oust [the Afghan] Rabbani [administration], Pakistan found itself in an awkward position. Hekmatyar had proved incapable of seizing and controlling defended territory: in this respect he was a bitter disappointment to his patrons. … In October 1994, [Pakistani interior minister] Babar [took] a group of Western ambassadors (including the US Ambassador to Pakistan John C. Monjo) to Kandahar, without even bothering to inform the Kabul government, even though it manned an embassy in Islamabad. … On 29 October 1994, a convoy of trucks, including a notorious ISI officer, Sultan Amir … and two figures who were later to become prominent Taliban leaders, entered Afghanistan.“[22]