Archiv: Camostat Mesylate / Camopan (medicine)


03.04.2020 - 10:35 [ Kai Kupferschmidt / threadreaderapp.com ]

My good news contribution for today: Researchers in Denmark are starting to test a promising drug in #covid19 patients, barely a month after research appeared showing the drug could stop the virus in cell culture.

KroganLab Camostat mesylate binds to a protein on human cells called TMPRSS2. And SARS-CoV-2 needs this protein to efficiently enter human cells: The spike protein on top of the virus attaches to the ACE2 receptor on human cells. And then TMPRSS2 needs to make a cut in the spike.

03.04.2020 - 10:32 [ Treponema Pallidum / Twitter ]

Denmark will start a clinical trial of a drug named camostat mesylate tomorrow—barely 1 month after a Cell paper showed the compound can prevent the novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, from entering human cells…

27.03.2020 - 19:32 [ Kopenhagen Post ]

Coronavirus Round-Up: Eight more deaths in Denmark

Researchers at the University of Aarhus are assessing an already established drug that could prevent the coronavirus from spreading into the human lungs and perhaps slow down the pandemic. Camostat mesylate was developed several years ago for the treatment of heartburn and pancreatitis in Japan, where it was approved by the Japanese Medicines Agency. A trial is planned to test it on 180 coronavirus patients across Denmark as early as next week.

26.03.2020 - 09:25 [ Forbes ]

There Is A Drug Already Used In Japan Which May Treat COVID-19, Says New Study

(03.03.2020)

“We knew from our previous work that camostat mesylate was active against other coronaviruses, including SARS-CoV. Therefore, we tested whether it is also active against SARS-CoV-2,” said Stefan Pöhlmann, PhD, Professor in the same institute in Göttingen. “Our study shows that camostat mesylate blocks infection of cells with SARS-CoV-2-like particles and with authentic, patient-derived SARS-CoV-2. Moreover, camostat mesylate inhibited infection of important target cells – human lung epithelial cells,” he added.

26.03.2020 - 08:47 [ Markus Hoffmann, Hannah Kleine-Weber, Nadine Krüger, Marcel Müller, Christian Drosten, Stefan Pöhlmann / biorxiv.org ]

The novel coronavirus 2019 (2019-nCoV) uses the SARS-coronavirus receptor ACE2 and the cellular protease TMPRSS2 for entry into target cells

(31.01.2020)

Here, we demonstrate that 2019-nCoV-S uses the SARS-coronavirus receptor, ACE2, for entry and the cellular protease TMPRSS2 for 2019-nCoV-S priming. A TMPRSS2 inhibitor blocked entry and might constitute a treatment option. Finally, we show that the serum form a convalescent SARS patient neutralized 2019-nCoV-S-driven entry. Our results reveal important commonalities between 2019-nCoV and SARS-coronavirus infection, which might translate into similar transmissibility and disease pathogenesis. Moreover, they identify a target for antiviral intervention.

(…)

The present study suggests that 2019-nCoV spread might also depend on TMPRSS2 activity and it is noteworthy that the serine protease inhibitor camostat mesylate blocks TMPRSS2 activity (24, 26) and has been approved in Japan for human use, although for an unrelated indication. This compound or related ones should be considered for treatment of 2019-nCoV infected patients.

26.03.2020 - 08:35 [ Deutsches Primatenzentrum - Leibniz-Institut für Primatenforschung ]

Preventing spread of SARS coronavirus-2 in humans: Göttingen infection researchers identify potential drug

(05.03.2020)

Since it is known that the drug camostat mesilate inhibits the protease TMPRSS2, the researchers have investigated whether it can also prevent infection with SARS-CoV-2. „We have tested SARS-CoV-2 isolated from a patient and found that camostat mesilate blocks entry of the virus into lung cells,“ says Markus Hoffmann, the lead author of the study. Camostat mesilate is a drug approved in Japan for use in pancreatic inflammation. „Our results suggest that camostat mesilate might also protect against COVID-19,“ says Markus Hoffmann. „This should be investigated in clinical trials.“

26.03.2020 - 08:30 [ Deutsches Primatenzentrum - Leibniz-Institut für Primatenforschung ]

Die Vermehrung von SARS-Coronavirus-2 im Menschen verhindern: Göttinger Infektionsforscher identifizieren potentielles Medikament

(05.03.2020)

Da bekannt ist, dass das Medikament Camostat Mesilate die Protease TMPRSS2 hemmt, haben die Forscher untersucht, ob es auch die Infektion mit SARS-CoV-2 verhindern kann. „Wir haben SARS-CoV-2 aus einem Patienten getestet und festgestellt, dass Camostat Mesilate das Eindringen des Virus in Lungenzellen blockiert“, sagt Markus Hoffmann, der Erstautor der Studie. Camostat Mesilate ist ein in Japan zugelassenes Medikament, das bei Entzündungen der Bauchspeicheldrüse eingesetzt wird. „Unsere Ergebnisse legen nahe, dass Camostat Mesilate auch vor der Krankheit COVID-19 schützen könnte“, sagt Markus Hoffmann. „Dies sollte im Rahmen von klinischen Studien untersucht werden.“

09.03.2020 - 05:48 [ Deutsches Primatenzentrum - Leibniz-Institut für Primatenforschung ]

Preventing spread of SARS coronavirus-2 in humans: Göttingen infection researchers identify potential drug

Viruses must enter cells of the human body to cause disease. For this, they attach to suitable cells and inject their genetic information into these cells. Infection biologists from the German Primate Center – Leibniz Institute for Primate Research in Göttingen, together with colleagues at Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, have investigated how the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 penetrates cells. They have identified a cellular enzyme that is essential for viral entry into lung cells: the protease TMPRSS2. A clinically proven drug known to be active against TMPRSS2 was found to block SARS-CoV-2 infection and might constitute a novel treatment option (Cell).

09.03.2020 - 05:40 [ Deutsches Primatenzentrum - Leibniz-Institut für Primatenforschung ]

Die Vermehrung von SARS-Coronavirus-2 im Menschen verhindern: Göttinger Infektionsforscher identifizieren potentielles Medikament

Um eine Krankheit auszulösen, müssen Viren in Körperzellen eindringen. Dazu heften sie sich an geeignete Zellen an und schleusen ihre Erbinformation in diese Zellen ein. Infektionsforscher vom Deutschen Primatenzentrum – Leibniz-Institut für Primatenforschung in Göttingen haben zusammen mit Kollegen an der Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin untersucht, wie das neuartige Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 in Zellen eindringt. Sie haben ein zelluläres Enzym identifiziert, das für den Eintritt des Virus in Lungenzellen unverzichtbar ist: die Protease TMPRSS2. Ein bereits existierendes Medikament, das diese Protease hemmt, könnte daher eine erfolgversprechende Behandlungsmöglichkeit darstellen (Cell).