Archiv: stealth


18.05.2019 - 17:41 [ Fool.com ]

Look Who’s Buying Lockheed Martin’s F-35 Now!

(07.05.2017)

Here’s a quick rundown of the major players to date, and how many F-35s they’re planning to buy:

Australia: 72 F-35As
Belgium: No decision yet made
Canada: 65 F-35As planned, but may buy Boeing (NYSE:BA) F-18s instead
Denmark: 27 F-35As
Israel: 50 F-35As
Italy: 60 F-35As, 30 F-35Bs
Japan: 42 F-35As
Netherlands: Up to 37 planned, but only 8 authorized so far
Norway: 52 F-35As planned, but only 22 authorized so far
South Korea: 40 F-35As
Turkey: 100 F-35As
United Kingdom: 138 F-35Bs
United States: 1,763 F-35As, 353 F-35Bs, and 327 F-35Cs

18.05.2019 - 17:10 [ DailyMail.co.uk ]

Hi-tech coating which makes RAF’s new £100million F-35 fighter jets ‚invisible‘ to enemy radar is allegedly wearing off quicker than expected – but the force said the aircraft is a ’significant success‘

(09.12.2018)

An RAF source told The Express: This situation obviously has to be rectified before the plane enters operational service.‘

The source also told the paper that defence secretary Gavin Williamson and RAF Air Chief Marshal Sir Stephen have always known about the issue.

18.05.2019 - 17:10 [ Wikipedia ]

Potential applications of carbon nanotubes

Radar absorption

Radars work in the microwave frequency range, which can be absorbed by MWNTs. Applying the MWNTs to the aircraft would cause the radar to be absorbed and therefore seem to have a smaller radar cross-section. One such application could be to paint the nanotubes onto the plane. Recently there has been some work done at the University of Michigan regarding carbon nanotubes usefulness as stealth technology on aircraft. It has been found that in addition to the radar absorbing properties, the nanotubes neither reflect nor scatter visible light, making it essentially invisible at night, much like painting current stealth aircraft black except much more effective. Current limitations in manufacturing, however, mean that current production of nanotube-coated aircraft is not possible. One theory to overcome these current limitations is to cover small particles with the nanotubes and suspend the nanotube-covered particles in a medium such as paint, which can then be applied to a surface, like a stealth aircraft.[64]

In 2010, Lockheed Martin Corporation applied for a patent for just such a CNT based radar absorbent material, which was reassigned and granted to Applied NanoStructure Solutions, LLC in 2012.[65] Some believe that this material is incorporated in the F-35 Lightning II

18.05.2019 - 17:05 [ flightglobal.com ]

Lockheed Martin reveals F-35 to feature nanocomposite structures

(26.05.2011)

Meanwhile, the same carbon nanotube reinforced polymer (CNRP) material is being considered to replace about 100 components made with other composites or metals throughout the F-35’s airframe, he said.

The shift to CNRP as an airframe material has been anticipated ever since carbon nanotubes were discovered in 1991.

18.05.2019 - 17:02 [ Technology Review ]

Nano Paint Could Make Airplanes Invisible to Radar

(05.12.2011)

However, it’s not yet practical to grow forests of nanotubes on the surface of an airplane directly—growing such forests is a high-temperature, high-pressure process done in chambers much smaller than an airplane. But Guo says it should be possible to grow the nanotubes on the surface of tiny particles which can then be suspended in paint.

24.05.2018 - 08:53 [ airforce-technology.com ]

UK RAF forms first front line F-35 squadron

(19.4.2018) Developed by Lockheed Martin, the F-35B Lightning II is a multi-role fighter aircraft that is capable of carrying out a wide range of operations.

It is the first aircraft in the world to integrate radar-evading stealth technology with supersonic speeds, as well as short take-off and landing capability.

24.05.2018 - 08:20 [ Haaretz / googleusercontent.com ]

Hamas in Gaza, Iranians in Syria: Israel’s F-35 Strikes Carried Message to Both Enemies and Allies

Norkin’s announcement, made at a conference in Israel for air force commanders from 20 countries, was planned for maximum exposure. It was a message to Israel’s adversaries in the region that the IAF now has “stealth” capabilities and is the first air force in the Middle East flying aircraft that are capable of evading radar systems and of operating in hostile environments, virtually undetected.