Archiv: Cannikin


03.10.2018 - 11:06 [ Greenpeace / fredsakademiet.dk ]

Nuclear Flashback: Report of a Greenpeace Scientific Expedition to Amchitka Island, Alaska – Site of the Largest Underground Nuclear Test in U.S. History

(1996) The momentum for the birth of Greenpeace arose from the grassroots movement against the Cannikin test. Motivated by the Quaker tradition of „bearing witness,“ twelve people set sail from Vancouver to stop the nuclear explosion at Amchitka. Radio communications of the Greenpeace vessel, the F/V Phyllis Cormack, were monitored by military intelligence. Eighteen crewmen of the U.S. Coast Guard vessel Confidence in Akutan Harbor (Aleutian Islands) signed a statement supporting the Greenpeace
protesters.

Although stormy weather and postponement of the test prevented the Phyllis Cormack from reaching Amchitka, this first Greenpeace action became a dramatic focal point for an international movement and inspired protests to a „greater sound and fury.“ An aide to one of the senators against the war in Vietnam was quoted as saying, „I’ve
never seen anything like it. Where we are looking for an issue to revive the ABM debate, the Atomic Energy Commission drops Cannikin in our lap. It’s almost enough to enlist every ecology freak in the country.“

03.10.2018 - 10:03 [ Military.com ]

Cannikin Nuclear Test Footage

(19.1.2012) The largest underground nuclear test conducted by the United States, Project Cannikin was one of three underground nuclear tests performed at different places on this 43-mile long island in the Aleutian Chain. This $200 million 1971 test was performed to test an Anti-Ballistic Missile warhead, for a Spartan ABM missile. It consisted of a 5 megaton-yield thermonuclear bomb, detonated in a 50-foot diameter chamber, at the bottom of a 5,875-foot shaft.

03.10.2018 - 10:00 [ sott.net ]

Project Cannikin: When the US created a magnitude 6.8 earthquake with a 5 megaton nuclear warhead

(18.8.2018) So you don’t buy that earthquakes can be man made? This is evidence from 60 years ago! It was detonated at least 6000 feet into the ground (roughly 2000 meters). This footage is from Project Cannikin, which was a proof-test for the 5 megaton warhead to be used on the Spartan missile system. Researchers were fearful of such a large device being detonated underground, so the testing was moved to way out in the middle of nowhere on the Amchitka penninsula in Alaska. The effect on the ground was necessary, and predicted, to see its pulse effect.

Seismic recordings of the test registered a magnitude of 6.8 on the richter scale as a direct result of the detonation. Over 1,000 after shocks with magnitudes as greater than 4.0 on the richter scale were recorded within the first 30 days following the blast.