Archiv: universities


25.11.2019 - 02:10 [ Markandey Katju / Firstpost ]

Protesting JNU students deserve your support not condemnation, writes ex-SC judge Markandey Katju

At the same time, the Delhi Police’s lathi-charge on agitating students must be condemned, and action must be demanded against those who ordered it. There was certainly nothing wrong in students going to Parliament to vent their just grievances.

I express my full support to the students​ of JNU.

25.11.2019 - 02:00 [ Al Jazeera / Youtube ]

Hundreds march in India to demand ‚affordable education for all‘

Students at a leading university in New Delhi have been protesting against a planned increase in their housing fees. They say most students are poor and cannot afford higher prices. They also allege that the Indian government wants to privatise higher education and make it difficult for many to attend university.

14.11.2019 - 18:55 [ Harvard International Law Journal, Forthcoming / papers.ssrn.com ]

Cut These Words: Passion and International Law of War Scholarship

(12.11.2019)

First, and perhaps the most fascinating mystery, is the near-total erasure of the Vietnam era,
and its vociferous doctrinal and policy debates, from the War on Terror international legal debate. The more one reads, the stranger it becomes—particularly once the invasion of Cambodia becomes publicly known in 1970, and the U.S. Department of State justifies the intervention in international legal terms. The doctrinal debate is eerily similar to those underlying key controversies between 2009 and 2018. The underlying law is, in many respects, largely the same. The contours of the international legal questions and their purported implications for the future disclose remarkable similarities. And yet, with the exception of that single footnote in the Al Aulaqi memorandum, there is almost no reference to the raging scholarly discourse that occurred barely two generations earlier. This would perhaps be understandable if I had gone deep into the national archives of, say, Bangladesh, and had found obscure texts that had never been published in English, or had never been made available in libraries or on the internet. But we are talking more or less about similar substantive debates occurring in similar journals by scholars contending with the same government offices. And it all just disappeared. Why?7

13.11.2019 - 16:12 [ RFI ]

French student’s self-immolation provokes anti-poverty rallies

University students demonstrated against precarious living conditions in cities around France on Tuesday, four days after a 22-year-old student set himself on fire in apparent protest of policies of President Emmanuel Macron and his own financial troubles.

28.07.2019 - 17:12 [ Global Research ]

Left-wing British University Took Hundreds of Thousands of Pounds from British Military for ‘Cultural Advice’

Students at the School of Oriental and African Studies (Soas) in London have slammed the payments as “outrageous.”

At least £400,000 has passed between the military and the university since the end of 2016, according to freedom of information requests filed by student group Decolonising Our Minds.

03.03.2019 - 15:09 [ Human Rights Watch ]

China: Police DNA Database Threatens Privacy

(15.5.2017) The issue of DNA collection has received some press attention. In one case in Shandong province, police collected DNA from more than 5,000 male students in one college in October 2013. The students were given no explanation about why their information was taken, and many “did not understand nor felt comfortable about it.” When reached by journalists, the school said it was to cooperate with the police’s request to establish a database about migrant populations, but the police said it was to solve a number of theft cases on the campus.

22.02.2019 - 14:01 [ New York Times ]

China Uses DNA to Track Its People, With the Help of American Expertise

Chinese government researchers contributed the data of 2,143 Uighurs to the Allele Frequency Database, an online search platform run by Dr. Kidd that was partly funded by the United States Department of Justice until last year. The database, known as Alfred, contains DNA data from more than 700 populations around the world.