Archiv: surveillance cameras


21.12.2019 - 02:02 [ Reuters ]

Wikileaks‘ Assange appears in court in Spain spying investigation

Owner and director of UC Global S.L. David Morales declined to say whether his company spied on Assange. “All the information is confidential and it belongs to the government of Ecuador,” Morales told El Pais in July. “We simply did a job.” …

Speaking outside the court in Westminster, former Ecuadorean consul in London Fidel Navraez accused Undercover Global of betraying Ecuador and Assange.

“That company was contracted by Ecuador in order to protect the embassy, protect Julian Assange, protect the embassy staff … but it is a corrupt company – we know that now,” he said.

12.12.2019 - 15:41 [ Electronic Frontier Foundation ]

Victory: San Diego to Suspend Face Recognition Program, Limits ICE Access To Criminal Justice Data

The end of San Diego’s program marks a major victory in the nationwide battle against face surveillance. But it doesn’t stop here. Join our campaign to end face surveillance on the local level across the country.

11.11.2019 - 17:50 [ Netzpolitik.org ]

Bundespolizei speichert Bodycam-Aufnahmen weiter bei Amazon

Die Bundespolizei müsse den Einsatz der neuen Instrumente ausführlich dokumentieren und eine Evaluation dürfe nicht dem Bundespolizeipräsidium überlassen werden. Eine unabhängige, wissenschaftliche Bewertung durch eine externe Stelle ist laut Innenministerium aber nicht geplant und wird auch nicht als notwendig erachtet.

13.09.2019 - 10:48 [ Electronic Frontier Foundation ]

Pioneer Award Ceremony 2019

Oakland Privacy is the group behind many influential anti-surveillance fights in Oakland, California and beyond. Oakland Privacy was born in 2013 when activists discovered a Homeland Security project called the Domain Awareness Center (DAC). DAC was meant to be an Oakland-wide surveillance gauntlet—with cameras, microphones, license plate readers—and a local data center to put it all together. But after Oakland Privacy led a ten-month campaign of opposition, the DAC was finally cancelled. Later, Oakland Privacy was one of the primary organizations behind the Oakland City Council’s creation of the first municipal privacy commission in the country, and then continued to be instrumental in bolstering opposition to surveillance around the San Francisco Bay Area and across the United States. For example, Oakland Privacy helped develop a comprehensive surveillance transparency regulatory law mandating use policies, civil rights impact reports, and annual audits, and pushed for its passage in multiple jurisdictions. The model is now in use in three Bay Area cities and other jurisdictions like Seattle, Nashville, and Cambridge, Massachusetts. Most recently, Oakland Privacy successfully worked to ban facial recognition in San Francisco and Oakland—two of the three cities in the country to enact such a ban.

06.09.2019 - 02:26 [ Reuters ]

Amazon’s Ring camera raises civil liberties concerns: U.S. senator

Facial recognition technology has been shown to disproportionately misidentify people of color. In a 2018 American Civil Liberties Union study, Rekognition incorrectly matched 28 members of Congress, including Markey, to a database of 25,000 publicly available arrest photos.

13.07.2019 - 00:58 [ CNN ]

London is tracking passengers on the Underground

London’s subway has become the latest transportation agency to use location data collected from people’s smartphones in a bid to improve services.
Transport for London, which operates the Tube, began collecting data in its stations this week, in order to determine how people are moving through the system and how crowded trains and platforms are. It said passengers will benefit as they will get more alerts about delays and congestion later this year. Extra trains could also be added on routes where the data indicates trains are especially congested.

16.05.2019 - 20:41 [ teleSUR ]

United States security forces have broken into the Venezuela embassy in Washington

teleSUR reporter Jorge Gestoso on site outside the embassy says there are security service, federal agents and dozens of D.C. police officers heavily armed at the back entrance of the embassy. According to Gestoso the authorities dressed in military gear took up position in the embassy’s basement where there are no surveillance cameras. This allowed U.S. authorities to make the arrests out of the site of the public and the media.