Archiv: our history


23.01.2019 - 15:46 [ YesNoMaybeDunnoWhynot ]

Kaiser Bill, The Freikorps and why I oppose a 2nd Referendum

I don’t think leaving the EU is the solution to the problems that led us here, but telling people who have finally had, and taken, the opportunity to vote for change that no, they can’t have what they voted for will inevitably lead to a rejection of democracy and the parties that have ‘stabbed them in the back’. And while some people would sink back into the resigned apathy they were in before, many would seek another way to find that change. Farage, Yaxley-Lennon, and Goddard etc are waiting for them.

23.01.2019 - 09:25 [ Green Leaves / Youtube ]

Tony Benn on European union – Best Bits #Lexit #GreenLeaves

Re-released today – Best of Tony Benn – talks European union (todays EU) and democracy to Roy Jenkins in 1975 – These are the highlights and have never sounded more relevant than today with the Brexit debate.

For full debate see playlist. Subscribe to our channel and share our playlists if you agree with Tony Benn.

Comments welcome below on anything to do with the current EU / Brexit debate.

The left leave case for democracy from Tony Benn – President of the Stop the War Coalition – 2001 – 2014 –

Tony Benn 1975 European Communities debate highlights

With thanks to Why Vote Leave

22.01.2019 - 06:53 [ Spiked ]

Would Rosa Luxemburg have been for Brexit? Red Rosa once called the idea of a European Union an ‘imperialist abortion’.

When it came to external relations, Luxemburg pointed out, the idea of a European Union was also deployed to divide Europe from the rest of the world: ‘Every time that bourgeois politicians have championed the idea of Europeanism, of the union of European States, it has been with an open or concealed point directed against the “yellow peril”, the “dark continent”, against the “inferior races”. In short, it has always been an imperialist abortion.’ They could write those last words on the EU’s tombstone.

15.12.2018 - 15:54 [ theNation.com ]

Tony Benn and the Five Essential Questions of Democracy

(14.3.2014) Tony Benn met Mahatma Gandhi when he was 12, knew and defended Nelson Mandela when the embrace of the anti-apartheid struggle was seen as a radical act, began his fifty years of service in the British Parliament when Winston Churchill was the leader of the conservative opposition and left after Tony Blair became prime minister, renounced his inherited title as the 2nd Viscount Stansgate so that he could continue to serve in the people’s parliament (declaring “I am not a reluctant peer but a persistent commoner”), ushered in a new age of popular communications and connectivity as Britain’s pioneering Minister of Technology in the 1960s and 1970s, championed cooperatives and worker ownership as Britain’s Minister of Industry in the 1970s, battled not just Margaret Thatcher but the compromising leaders of his own Labour Party on behalf of the working class in the 1980s and finished his almost 60 years of public life as an international leader of the opposition to the wars of whim and folly that have stolen so much of the promise of our time.

10.12.2018 - 12:17 [ thebrexiteer / Twitter ]

Michael Portillo – “The EU has made a strategic error, short of marching PM May into a railway carriage in Compiègne Forest, they could not have produced a more humiliating surrender. “History tells us when you humiliate countries with a surrender, it doesn’t go well.“ #Brexit

04.08.2018 - 09:36 [ Jeremy Corbyn / Guardian ]

I will root antisemites out of Labour – they do not speak for me

Jewish people have also been at the heart of the labour movement throughout our history. So no one can, or should, try to dismiss or belittle the concerns expressed by so many Jewish people and organisations about what has been happening in the party I am proud to lead.

I do not for one moment accept that a Labour government would represent any kind of threat, let alone an “existential threat”, to Jewish life in Britain, as three Jewish newspapers recently claimed. That is the kind of overheated rhetoric that can surface during emotional political debates. But I do acknowledge there is a real problem that Labour is working to overcome. And I accept that, if any part of our national community feels threatened, anxious or vulnerable, not only must that be taken at face value but we must all ensure those fears are put to rest.