Archive

25.08.2018 - 16:16 [ SaveYourInternet.today ]

Save your internet today! Join the protest on copyright action day in your city on August 26.

Amsterdam:
26 August – 15:00 – voor de Openbare Bibliotheek, Oosterdokskade 143

Bergen:
August 26 – 18:00 – Nedre Ole Bulls plass 3

Berlin:
26. August – 15.00 – Brandenburger Tor

Bielsko-Biała:
August 26 – 18:00 – plac Wojska Polskiego

Frankfurt
26. August – 13:30 – Paulsplatz

Graz:
26. August – 15.00 – Schloßbergplatz

Hamburg:
26. August – 14:00 – Mönkebergbrunnen

Helsinki:
August 26 – 12:00 – Narinkkatori

Innsbruck:
August 26 – 11:00 – Fotoaktion am Marktplatz

Karlsruhe:
26. August – 14:00 – Stephansplatz

Katowice:
August 26 – 18:00 – Rynek

Köln:
26. August – 10:00 – Domplatte (Blau-Gold-Haus)

Kraków:
August 26 – 18:00 – Rynek Główny

Lisboa:
September 8 – 17:00 – Praça de Luís de Camões

Ljubljana:
August 26 – 11:00 – Prešernov trg

Łódź:
August 26 – 18:00 – Plac Wolności

Lund:
August 26 – Clemenstorget

Mainz:
25. August – 11:00 – Hauptbahnhof

München:
26. August – 13:00 – Marienplatz

Paris:
August 26 – 14:30 – Place Jules Joffrin, 75018 Paris

Praha:
August 26 – 16:00 – Palackého náměstí

Rennes:
August 26 – 14:30 – Hôtel de Ville de Rennes

Stockholm:
August 26 – 12:00 – Raoul Wallenbergs Torg

Stuttgart:
26. August – 14:00 – Marienplatz

Warszawa:
August 26 – 16:00 – Plac Defilad

Wien:
26. August – 15.00 – Stephansplatz

Wrocław:
August 26 – 18:00 – Rynek, 50-101 Wrocław, Polska

06.07.2018 - 03:06 [ GIZMODO ]

Wikipedia Italy Blocks All Articles in Protest of EU’s Ruinous Copyright Proposals

(3.7.2018) The EU Copyright Directive is the first update to European copyright laws since 2001—making it the first time lawmakers have grappled with copyright since the internet became entwined with every facet of our lives. Some of the most prominent technology experts from around the globe have taken issue with several key items in the legislation. In June, Jimmy Wales, the founder of Wikipedia, joined more than 100 tech pioneers to urge European Parliament to reconsider voting in favor of the new regulations. Other signatories on the letter included Vint Cerf, one of the “fathers of the internet,” and Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the World Wide Web.

27.06.2018 - 19:17 [ ORF ]

Kehrtwende bei Copyright im EU-Parlament

Von Bürgerrechtsorganisationen über den Berichterstatter der Vereinten Nationen zur Meinungsfreiheit, die gesamte „Hall of Fame“ der Internet-Pioniere, Service-Provider, die aufstrebende europäische Digitalwirtschaft und nicht zuletzt die Autorinnen und Autoren, die tatsächlichen Urheber jener Artikel, für die von den Verlegern eine „Linksteuer“ erhoben werden soll. Seit sich zuletzt im Netz verbreitet hatte, dass auch die beliebten „Memes“ dadurch kostenpflichtig werden sollten, herrscht ein Proteststurm im Netz, MEPs aller Fraktionen werden mit Protestmails bombardiert.

14.06.2018 - 19:20 [ Techdirt ]

European Citizens: You Stopped ACTA, But The New Copyright Directive Is Much, Much Worse: Speak Up

It’s understandable that people are getting fatigued from all the various attacks on the internet, but as I’ve noted recently, one of the biggest threats to our open internet is the incredibly bad Copyright Directive that is on the verge of being voted on by the EU Parliament’s Legal Affairs Committee.

29.03.2018 - 15:43 [ Techdirt ]

Aussie Rightsholders Look To Feature Creep Site-Blocking To Search-Blocking, Because Of Course They Are

When it comes to censorship in the name of copyright, we’ve made the point time and again that opening this door an inch will cause supporters of censorship to try to barge through and open it all the way. Inevitably, when a population tries to satiate the entertainment industry by giving them just a little censorship, that industry will ask for more and more and more.

A good example of this can be seen right now in Australia. Like far too many countries, Australia began a site-blocking practice three or so years ago. Currently, the Department of Commnications is asking for feedback on the effectiveness of this practice as well as feedback on each step in the process itself. The way it works in Australia is that rightsholders have to get an initial injunction which then winds its way to a site being blocked as a „pirate site.“ Well, for the largest entertainment industry groups in Australia, the feedback is essentially, „This is great, let’s censor even more!“